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WLIA RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP

Working towards equal voice, equal representation and equal recognition. 

The Women's Leadership Institute Australia Research Fellowship funds the professional time of an individual or team breaking new ground in the service of advancing gender equality. Fellowships are only awarded with the support of an appropriate research institution.

Recipients of the WLIA Fellowship are supported to pursue their stated pursuits.

WLIA Research Fellowship Recipient 2019

Danielle Wood, Budget Policy and Institutional Reform Program Director, Grattan Institute is the recipient of our latest Research Fellowship with support of the Trawalla Foundation.

 

Danielle Wood, Budget Policy and Institutional Reform Program Director, Grattan Institute is the recipient of our latest Research Fellowship with support of the Trawalla Foundation.

 

Danielle researches economic and social policy. Her next report for the Grattan Institute will focus on female workforce participation. Removing disincentives for women to participate in paid work is one of the big opportunities to boost economic growth and improve equality of opportunity, status, and financial security for Australian women.

 

Danielle is Chair and co-founder of the Women in Economics Network, which seeks to promote and support the contributions of female economists in Australia. She has recently been elected as President of the Economic Society of Australia and will be the first woman to occupy the role in the Society’s 94-year history. 

 

 

I'm honoured to receive this support from the Women’s Leadership Institute Australia and the Trawalla Foundation. I share the values of the Foundation and very much look forward to working together to generate positive policy change for Australian women." 

When the environment makes gender salient, there is a ripple effect on the mind. We start to think of ourselves in terms of our gender, and stereotypes and social expectations become more prominent in the mind. This can change self-perception, alter interests, debilitate or enhance ability, and trigger unintentional discrimination. In other words, the social context influences who you are, how you think and what you do.” 

CORDELIA FINE

Recipient of the WLIA Fellowship 2016-2017

NEWSLETTER